Keeping Up with Changing Sleep Behaviors

I can remember the moment perfectly. My lungs were unweighted and my mind was flooded with peace. I felt nothing short of free. 

This was the moment I decided to listen to my mama instinct and finally broke free from the "sleep consulting" industry.

I love working with parents. I love hearing about babies' development and toddlers' antics. I love offering tired moms and dads peace of mind and confidence to achieve sleep in a way that fits their child and family. And, I certainly love the feeling I am gifted when I read our testimonials and adorable updates. I have nothing short of a rewarding career. 

And it's thanks to all of you, my clients.

The clients I worked with during my first year of "sleep consulting" changed the course of my career, and I cannot express how grateful I am to have had these incredible moms and dads be a part of my journey.

Even though parents had successfully achieved sleep and rated their experience with me as "over the moon," I would often hear from them down the road, saying, "things have gone off track and we don't know what to do."

Why was I repeatedly hearing from parents who were 'successful graduates' of the sleep consulting process? Because a child's sleep behaviors can change with any little, itty bitty development, such as:

  • finding their hands
  • rolling
  • sitting
  • standing
  • cruising 
  • walking
  • running
  • motor boating with their lips (you know what I mean... when they purse their lips together and basically spit everywhere)
  • babbling
  • screaming
  • talking
  • making friends
  • making believe

and let's not forget:

  • teething
  • nap transitions
  • sleep space transitions
  • change in caregiving
  • having visitors
  • travelling
  • sickness
  • learning to potty
  • changes in family dynamics
  • moves
  • the bed as moved one inch from where it usually is
  • Lovey is dirty
  • the sky is blue (because... sometimes there is no real reason)

With all these potential "derailments,"  how would a parent keep up with their child's changing sleep behaviors, especially when the sleep plan was prescribed for a very specific point in time? (See our wildly shared first blog on our feelings toward traditional sleep training here.)

Instead of traditional sleep training, "my" parents also needed the knowledge and confidence to evolve their family's sleep practices as their children matured and sleep behaviors changed.

THIS is what our Parenting for Sleep approach is all about! We love it and our graduate families do too, because they become the experts on their child's sleep behaviors.

To all of my "first year families": there are the only two things you will ever need to keep up with your child's sleep: i) observation and, ii) confidence to learn in the face of "mistakes." (Reminder: there are generally no real mistakes in parenting, only learning and moving forward.) During that first year, I preached consistency and particular timings, and I may have pushed you outside of your comfort zone. Now, I am asking you to update that perspective with a renewed emphasis, above all else, on having the confidence to observe and learn from your child. How else are we to learn what works for our children?

I continue to learn from Ella every day; sometimes it's challenging, but it's always rewarding. See snippets of her routine journey below!


  • are you ready to kick traditional sleep training to the curb?
  • ready to trust your parenting instincts?
  • ready to trust your child's behaviours?

Schedule a discovery call with us! We love hearing from you!


Here is a quick picture album of the progression of my family's sleep routines over the years:

 

I loved it when Ella relaxed for naps in my arms for the first ~6 months. (BONUS for me: if we were out and about, she would BF in the wrap and snooze away!)

I loved it when Ella relaxed for naps in my arms for the first ~6 months. (BONUS for me: if we were out and about, she would BF in the wrap and snooze away!)

From about 6 months to 18 months, Ella loved to simply relax with a book before bed. Over the year, Ella went from eating book corners to pointing out and naming her favorite images. Books are still a BIG part of routines, but...

From about 6 months to 18 months, Ella loved to simply relax with a book before bed. Over the year, Ella went from eating book corners to pointing out and naming her favorite images. Books are still a BIG part of routines, but...

Roughhousing became a HUGE hit too. Throwing toys at each other's heads, jumping, flipping, and following Ella's laughter helps us all feel connected before bedtime, especially after days with company or when Ella is at homecare. We get ROWDY!

Roughhousing became a HUGE hit too. Throwing toys at each other's heads, jumping, flipping, and following Ella's laughter helps us all feel connected before bedtime, especially after days with company or when Ella is at homecare. We get ROWDY!